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Thread: First Dance Lighting?

  1. #41
    Senior Member yourdj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Smyth View Post
    I'd actually go as far as to say ban lasers full stop, but that's another conversation for another time.
    I think Laser light is very harsh, where as LED seems to get the thumbs up from many photographers. Banning lasers on first dance is a good call, i don't think it looks nice at all. Looking back as my mess of lights back in the day, it was atrocious!! Especially the naff green and red ones with shapes. I have a blue Lanta cluster now (awesome laser) but use that sparingly now at certain functions, works well on its own with a low light uplighting. Dottyights on the guests and B&G in general on first dance is a no-no for me on First dance.

    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Smyth View Post
    I completely disagree with that. I know a lot of high end photographers who use flash. If used correctly, it's works really well.:
    I am best friends with one of the best wedding photographers in Hampshire and recommend a dozen other excellent photographers (i.e. the best of the best i have seen). They all use flash, like having a decent DJ controller, its how you use it that counts!! I am an advocate for non flash photography, but you can get some stunning shots using flash creatively. Its the photographers that have the flash down facing the couple that tend to be the crap ones, rather than off camera and bounce.

    On that note i have seen quite a few photographers doing non flash photography that clearly don't understand how their cameras/lenses light work, they are just trying to be cool, some of their shots are terrible. I would choose a small flash with an f3+ over circa f1.2 lens and no flash any day and a much better depth of field, although a decent arty non flash shot can really be awesome!
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  2. #42
    MDD Supporter Steven's Avatar
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    I have just published a blog on this subject if anyone would like a read

    http://stevenmaddison.co.uk/first-dance-lighting/
    North East Wedding DJ - www.stevenmaddison.co.uk - covering Newcastle Sunderland Durham and the surrounding areas.

  3. #43
    Senior Member yourdj's Avatar
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    Thats great, very informative, great page

    Perhaps mention lasers and especially the colour red as thats a tough one to get rid of. Lasers on Raw files are also a very hard light. Perhaps try and get some examples from some photographers you know? A video would perhaps make it clearer what the difference is, maybe its worth doing a fake first dance, one with lighting all on them like a nuclear holocaust and then one with properly controlled colour changes & spot lighting.

    This:

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    vs this:

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    I would say that every photographer is different, some photographers may relish having dots on a couple as they can really create some totally different shots from the main day (B&W looks good with dots). Another may love having the lights blaring at them direct from the booth another it may ruin the shot. They may want to shoot from the booth or the other direction. I am sure there are a lot of variables and the photographer proficiency will ultimately count. One things for sure, the flash down - program mode photographer will struggle in any situation where its either too dark or the too much light and dots on the couple.

    Maybe get a video testimonial from your 2-3 fav photographers with their opinion on lighting and a little link to their site. Great networking. Photographers are always really shocked when i ask them if the lighting is OK for them as they are just not used to it and will be hesitant to ask a DJ to change the lighting. Depends on the photographer mind you. i had one guy go up to my puny 10 watt pinspot cake light and move up himself (quite hard). He said 'its knocking my white balance out!' I said (annoyed as he had not even asked) 'well i have done over 2000 weddings and not one photographer has mentioned that when asked'. He was a pre-madonna all day so I made a point of looking on this site and his photos were crap. I knew they would be when he spent half an hour telling me what a prime lens is. WOW
    Last edited by yourdj; 08-03-2018 at 09:27 PM.
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  4. #44
    Senior Member Jim - Scotland's Party DJ's Avatar
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    It amazes me how many DJs simply don't give a proverbial when it comes to potentially ruining a first dance shot.

    I got into a 'heated debate' a while back on a local FB group when someone posted a video from their gig with what I assume was a bunch of cheap swarm type lights blasting the bride and groom - not only did it make her look like a Christmas tree (literally, her dress looking green and had blue, red, purple and cheap looking amber (you know the faded one you get on cheap fixtures) blinking all over her), it was S2L so they were just going mental throughout this nice slow song.

    I used to colour match to their scheme but in the past wee while I've stuck to a simple slow white pulse on my hex bars and the jelly domes on white rotating slowly in opposite directions - the amount of brides who mention how good what was essentially a 2 minute DMX job is incredible, especially given the lights aren't particularly flashy or fancy.

    Wee example at the start here:

    https://www.scotlandspartydj.com/ing...edding-simpson

    I always ask the photographer if they lighting is OK too. I know fine well it is but it's a nice, natural way of showing: "Hey, I'm on your side and want you to get the best shots you can." No brainer.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim - Scotland's Party DJ View Post
    It amazes me how many DJs simply don't give a proverbial when it comes to potentially ruining a first dance shot.
    Yup - and that's shown by how many photographers are amazed when I show them that I provide a white wash for the first dance.

    Some have mentioned that they can put their flash away, and others seem stunned that I've considered what is best for the photographer.

    Ultimately, by considering what is best for the photographer, I'm helping my couple get the best results -and surely that's what we all aim to do? Although judging by the number of S2L flashing dots going round at first dances, I guess not.

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  6. #46
    Dinosaur Excalibur's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim - Scotland's Party DJ View Post
    It amazes me how many DJs simply don't give a proverbial when it comes to potentially ruining a first dance shot.
    Buy me a small sherry, and I'll blab.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jim - Scotland's Party DJ View Post
    I always ask the photographer if they lighting is OK too. I know fine well it is but it's a nice, natural way of showing: "Hey, I'm on your side and want you to get the best shots you can." No brainer.


    Quote Originally Posted by rth_discos View Post
    Yup - and that's shown by how many photographers are amazed when I show them that I provide a white wash for the first dance.

    Some have mentioned that they can put their flash away, and others seem stunned that I've considered what is best for the photographer.

    Ultimately, by considering what is best for the photographer, I'm helping my couple get the best results -and surely that's what we all aim to do? Although judging by the number of S2L flashing dots going round at first dances, I guess not.
    The only divergence from my normal routine is that it's unusual to offer white wash, usually the Cheetahs are doing open white circles slowly, but hey if a tog asked for white, I can do that.
    Excalibur. Older than the average DJ.

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  7. #47
    Senior Member Jim - Scotland's Party DJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rth_discos View Post
    Yup - and that's shown by how many photographers are amazed when I show them that I provide a white wash for the first dance.

    Absolutely - what we do isn't rocket science in any way shape or form, it's actually a skoosh of a job really at it's most basic, that's where a lot of the "lower" end guys fall flat on their face, they don't think (or don't care) about the little details.

    I had a guy shadow me a while ago and I was explaining to him I do x (e.g. talk to the tog) because a, I do y because of b, I do z because of z...

    All just really simple little touches, why do I do them? As I pointed out to him - people notice what they don't notice

    I have a pal who likes music but isn't musically inclined - we'll go and watch a band and he'll say "there's something not right with them is there?"

    He doesn't actually know what's off is the drummer playing a bit in front of the beat, the guitar being slightly flat or the base tone not fitting in but he KNOWS something isn't right.

    Flip it round, when a band is on fire and they have amazing tone and a great stage presence, people pick up on that.

    I apply that to my DJing.

    People don't go - he's been smiling all night - but they notice I'm enjoying myself

    They don't go - he's not faffed about on his phone - but they notice I'm engaged at all times

    They don't go - wow he has some high end PA gear and a pro grade wireless mic - but they notice the music sounds good and I'm nice and clear on the mic

    And pertinent to this - they don't go - wow that dude has DMX'd those lights - but they notice that everything looks really nice.

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