Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.
Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 31

Thread: Microphone questions

  1. #11
    yourdj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    The New Forest
    Age
    38
    Posts
    7,110

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nakatomi View Post
    What's so hard about sliding a fader once in a while?! :O
    I dont even think about doing that now when i talk on the microphone. Much better to choose when to duck the music relating to what you are saying, when and the volume relating to the room and whats going on at the time.
    Last edited by yourdj; 03-06-2017 at 01:14 PM.
    Your DJ - Mobile DJ The New Forest, Southampton & Hampshire. Toby
    http://www.yourdj.co.uk/ | http://www.phatdiscos.co.uk/

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bristol
    Age
    41
    Posts
    2,972

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Excalibur View Post
    Mute buttons don't hurt, either.
    How do you survive Karaoke with a mute button? In all seriousness... absolutely essential for cutting idiots who think they're going to rap over backing music inbetween tracks, or make impromptu speeches.

    Julian
    http://www.bristoldiscohire.co.uk - Quality Disco and Equipment hire for Bristol & Bath
    Weddings, Birthday Parties, Kids Parties, School Disco's, Quizes and more

  3. #13
    Nakatomi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Durham, Co Durham
    Posts
    2,828

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by yourdj View Post
    I dont even think about doing that now when i talk on the microphone. Much better to choose when to duck the music relating to what you are saying, when and the volume relating to the room and whats going on at the time.
    It pains me that so many DJs can't or just don't duck music properly. It seems to go between not doing it at all & just flicking the fader down on syllables. Me? Oh I was a proper sad little individual, practising talking over tracks for hours on end when I first started. So I'm (sort of) a natural at it now Denon's MC series ducking isn't the worst I've ever heard - it'd certainly be OK for kids parties etc where you're not behind the console - though the last kids party I did I still did the ducking with my tablet remote control

  4. #14
    yourdj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    The New Forest
    Age
    38
    Posts
    7,110

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nakatomi View Post
    It pains me that so many DJs can't or just don't duck music properly. It seems to go between not doing it at all & just flicking the fader down on syllables. Me? Oh I was a proper sad little individual, practising talking over tracks for hours on end when I first started. So I'm (sort of) a natural at it now Denon's MC series ducking isn't the worst I've ever heard - it'd certainly be OK for kids parties etc where you're not behind the console - though the last kids party I did I still did the ducking with my tablet remote control
    Its where the Peter Kay 'mmmhmhmhmhm - ha ha' ha comes from as DJ's talk over the music playing and never have the inclination to video themselves from the other side of the room and realise no one can hear a word they are saying. One of my DJ's used to do it an no matter how much I told him to duck the music, almost to nothing at points of an announcement, he never did.
    Your DJ - Mobile DJ The New Forest, Southampton & Hampshire. Toby
    http://www.yourdj.co.uk/ | http://www.phatdiscos.co.uk/

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire
    Age
    36
    Posts
    955

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nakatomi View Post
    Denon's MC series ducking isn't the worst I've ever heard
    I was pleasantly surprised by it - certainly for when you're doing stuff away from the booth, it works.

    I remember having the ducking feature on my first mixer in the late 90s. It had two issues: 1 it was overly sensitive - just holding the mic made it start ducking, and 2, it was very slow to recover - so you'd hear it fade back up over a period of 5 seconds.

    So from that I never used ducking, and always used the fader. But handy to have a reasonably good ducking feature on the mc6000mk2 for any time I'm away from the booth.

  6. #16
    King Of Cheese Moderator DazzyD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Between Sunderland & Durham
    Age
    44
    Posts
    5,063

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nakatomi View Post
    Personally I'd leave them to it.

    Anyway your best bet is to take 4 outs from the receiver to a small PA mixer & mix them properly. Mark the mic colours on the mixer channels.

    As for ducking - I can't ducking stand ducking. It's never sounded good on anything. What's so hard about sliding a fader once in a while?! :O
    Quote Originally Posted by Excalibur View Post

    Yes, I do use the summed output of the Chord into a mic channel on the VMS, when I'm offering what I call " Karaoke Lite ", ie the big mixer stays at home, and I can still use the Micromax. Mainly for when Karaoke is alleged to be secondary to the disco.

    Nothing beats having the enhanced capabilities of a dedicated mixer though, as long as it has faders, FX, and enough channels. ( Mute buttons don't hurt, either. )
    Which is why I always used 12+ channel mixers. Enough for music, karaoke and several mics at one. Colour-coded cable connectors so I always knew which mic was controlled by which slider!
    Dazzy D
    Lightning Disco & Entertainment

    Born to make you party!

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Rotherham
    Age
    51
    Posts
    363

    Default

    Following on......

    Xmas eve I had a disco/karaoke. No issues with the disco side , but....

    For the karaoke, I was running 4 channels, using the single output from the Chord into MC6000.

    Absolute nightmare. I was constantly twiddling with individual gains on each mic channel, trying to adjust for each singer, some really quiet, some really loud.

    The main issue was with the loud singers, altered the gain to use above min on the receiver, and still too hot, massive distortion. Had a few complaints regarding sound quality, and venue not too happy either.


    So, I've invested in the Multicom pro 4600, this seems to do the trick when tested with my ZMX122. Nice clean signal as expected. However, via the MC6000, still way to hot and distorted.
    Looks like I'll not be using my MC6000 when karaoke is involved. (Too small a budget to mess around with setting up two mixers etc)

    I've now a question regarding to the wiring on the Multicom....

    The documentation shows plugging the mics into the mixer then using TRS inserts to link to the 4600. My current mixer does not have insert capabilities.

    So my question is, can the mics be plugged into the 4600, then the outputs feeding the mixer? (This is what I did in my test), or should the mics plug into the mixer as stated?
    I'm guessing this is so the 4600 is using the signal with the channel gain applied from the mixer, feeding the gain controlled signal back into the mixer?

    Are there any pros/cons of wiring mic -> 4600 -> Mixer, against mic -> mixer -> 4600

    Many thanks
    Edward.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire
    Age
    36
    Posts
    955

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fullcontact68 View Post
    . However, via the MC6000, still way to hot and distorted.
    If this is the original MC6000, the mic inputs were famously hot.

    I have the MC6000mk2 and it's great.

    You may find an XLR attenuator solves your problem.

    Someone who has done this on the MC6000 will know how many dbs to reduce by, but essentially you're looking at something like this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/10db-Line-B.../dp/B0075469L8

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Rotherham
    Age
    51
    Posts
    363

    Default

    I've tried an attenuator before, (quite a while ago, don't think I had much success, but my memory is crap recently), and Yes, it's a Mk1.

    I would have thought that using the gain control on the wireless receiver would reduce the signal strength into the MC6000, hence not tried putting an attenuator inline. Would it make a difference?

  10. #20
    Dinosaur Excalibur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    East Yorkshire
    Age
    64
    Posts
    25,638

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rth_discos View Post
    If this is the original MC6000, the mic inputs were famously hot.

    I have the MC6000mk2 and it's great.

    You may find an XLR attenuator solves your problem.
    From what I've heard and experienced, I think the actual phrase is " Less bad ".

    Large Live/FOH mixers are falling in price for quality ones nowadays. Cheap doesn't necessarily mean Behringer nowadays. Since moving from Behringer to Peavey, there's been a marked improvement in my Karaoke.

    Dazzy is half right about using a live mixer with colour coded mics. Trouble is, you can't identify the shouty ones fast enough, usually. It does help though if you only have to lower the gain on the channel with the flashing red light in front of your face!

    You can easily carry on using the 6000 with karaoke, just run every mic from the Live mixer, and feed the 6000 into a tape input. That means you only use the faders on the 6000, and don't have any on the live mixer to get confused with.
    Excalibur. Older than the average DJ.

    www.excaliburmobiledisco.co.uk

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •