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Thread: Taking pictures at gigs!

  1. #11
    King Of Cheese Moderator DazzyD's Avatar
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    Paul, thanks for that tip about putting a disclaimer in the contract. Been wondering about taking pics for our website but was thinking that we might have to announce it at the gig and that someone's bound to object (out of about 250-300 people). If we put the responsibility on to the client to let the guests know then it gets us off the hook. Anyone else had legal issues with photos before?

    By the way - Hello everyone. Been off the site for nearly a year so it's good it be back. We had our daughter born prematurely and family obviously comes first. All's well now so I'm getting back in to the swing of things

  2. #12
    Senior Member Andy Westcott's Avatar
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    Quote rob:
    "I've discovered the answer is to take pics with the flash off, and to then lighten them afterwards with some software."

    That's one way of doing it and as you said it works for you, although you will be operating with long exposure times which will cause considerable blurring of the subject. (May actually be a desirable effect.) Also, there's a limit to what software can do; You can't generate information which wasn't recorded in the first place, so if the original is very under-exposed, you may have trouble getting a decent result without excessive loss of contrast or creating graininess.

    I agree with Ed in that you need to partially illuminate the scene with off-camera flash to freeze some detail to avoid getting a mass of blurred images, and let the disco lighting create the interesting colours.

    Don't forget that you can increase the gain of the amplifier attached to the CCD which has the effect of increasing the sensitivity of the camera in much the same way as you can choose high speed film - in fact the control is usually labelled 'ISO' on digital cameras. This allows the use of faster shutter speeds but has the trade-off of creating additional noise on the picture.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Westcott View Post
    Quote rob:
    "I've discovered the answer is to take pics with the flash off, and to then lighten them afterwards with some software."

    That's one way of doing it and as you said it works for you, although you will be operating with long exposure times which will cause considerable blurring of the subject. (May actually be a desirable effect.)
    Indeed it works fine for me, and I have no problem with the blurring effect.

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Westcott View Post
    Also, there's a limit to what software can do; You can't generate information which wasn't recorded in the first place, so if the original is very under-exposed, you may have trouble getting a decent result without excessive loss of contrast or creating graininess.
    This is one thing which really surprised me.

    I have disco photos with areas that are so dark they're virtually black, and yet lightening the photos with software brings out all the detail not in the original photo, so the camera obviously recorded the information in the first place, even though you can't see it...which I don't really understand, although I'm not very technical!

  4. #14
    Senior Member Andy Westcott's Avatar
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    It's possible, especially if the camera records at 48-bit depth. I have taken photographs of old mine workings (don't even ask!) where, as you said, there is little visible on the original, but with a bit of software 'pushing' you can resolve a surprising amount of detail. It will, however, lose some detail as compared to a correctly exposed original, and if a particular region has recorded at zero level, no amount of tweaking will produce anything but that.

    But I agree - this is a good way of obtaining useable images in low light condtions.

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    Some useful information there. Cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by markthedoc View Post
    Really useful thread. Cheers.
    Quote Originally Posted by markthedoc View Post
    Really useful guide. Cheers.
    Quote Originally Posted by markthedoc View Post
    Some useful information there. Cheers
    Trying to get your post count up, Mark?


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    I had a problem with my posts not appearing last night when I was posting them!
    I'd just started using a new browser and thought it was a problem my end, but it was an anti-spam thing cos I'm new.

    Sorry

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    Founder Solitaire Events Ltd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markthedoc View Post
    I had a problem with my posts not appearing last night when I was posting them!
    I'd just started using a new browser and thought it was a problem my end, but it was an anti-spam thing cos I'm new.

    Sorry
    It's a moderation queue and I'm not quite sure why no-one saw it last night! Bizarre.

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    Senior Member Dillmiester's Avatar
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    Ive found turning off the flash, using a tripod and upping the exposure times creates some great effects...
    Times Entertainments

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    I have been experimenting with a Kodak c913 9.1 mega pixel camera (Argos £49.99) and with the flash off and manually set the iso to 800 you can get some pretty decent results.

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